George Ferencz

George Ferencz

E. Frances’s danceable polka melody gets presented here in an arrangement for the instrumentation of Alford’s “Hungry Five” series of Polka/German band books. This lighthearted piece provides opportunity for all players to take on melodic as well os other interesting accompaniment patterns that get passed around the ensemble, maintaining variety and momentum throughout for players and listeners alike.

No extreme range or technical requirements are presented here for any of the instrumentalists in this arrangement. Even fairly young ensembles could use this piece for German band performance. Ready to go for your Oktoberfest gig!

The traditional Italian “Splendor” polka is presented here in an arrangement for the instrumentation of Alford’s “Hungry Five” series of Polka/German band books. Besides the melody, other accompaniment patterns also get passed around between all of the different instrumental parts maintaining variety and momentum throughout for players and listeners alike.

No extreme range or technical requirements are presented here for any of the instrumentalists in this arrangement. Even fairly young ensembles could use this piece for German band performance. Ready to go for your Oktoberfest gig!

O. Sokol’s homage to the city of Chicago is presented here in an arrangement for the instrumentation of Alford’s “Hungry Five” series of Polka/German band books. This lighthearted piece provides opportunity for all players to take on melodic as well os other interesting accompaniment patterns that get passed around the ensemble, maintaining variety and momentum throughout for players and listeners alike.

No extreme range or technical requirements are presented here for any of the instrumentalists in this arrangement. Even fairly young ensembles could use this piece for German band performance. Ready to go for your Oktoberfest gig!

Fritz Wolter’s piece with the fun title (worthy of wisecracks!) is presented here in an arrangement for the instrumentation of Alford’s “Hungry Five” series of Polka/German band books. Besides the melody, other accompaniment patterns also get passed around between all of the different instrumental parts maintaining variety and momentum throughout for players and listeners alike.

No extreme range or technical requirements are presented here for any of the instrumentalists in this arrangement. Even fairly young ensembles could use this piece for German band performance. Ready to go for your Oktoberfest gig!

This classic clarinet solo is presented here in an arrangement for the instrumentation of Alford’s “Hungry Five” series of Polka/German band books as a chance to feature a talented clarinetist in your ensemble. In this edition, the solo clarinetist plays the familiar melody throughout while accompanied by the remainder of the ensemble.

Other than the technical nature of the 1st Clarinet part (which is probably already well under the fingers of an experienced player), there are no extreme range or technical requirements for the remaining instrumentalists in this arrangement. Even fairly young ensembles could use this to feature a more advanced clarinetist on a German band performance. Ready to go for your Oktoberfest gig!

Nancy Bierbaum composed “Zinzinnati” in 1907 and her tribute to the Ohio city is presented here in an arrangement for the instrumentation of Alford’s “Hungry Five” series of Polka/German band books. In this edition, the melody gets passed back and forth between the various instruments along with a number of other active lines to keep things interesting for players and listeners alike.

While “Zinzinnati” shouldn’t feel out of place in context with other Hungry Five pieces, this longer composition has a more syncopated ragtime flavor to it. There are no extreme range requirements in this arrangement, and the technical challenges shouldn’t be out of reach for intermediate players so even fairly young ensembles could use this to include some syncopated fun on a German band performance. Ready to go for your Oktoberfest gig!

“Edelweiss” is presented here in an arrangement for the instrumentation of Alford’s “Hungry Five” series of Polka/German band books. In this edition, the enduring and beloved melody from Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “The Sound Of Music” gets passed back and forth between the various instruments to keep things interesting for players and listeners alike.

Every Hungry Five band should keep a familiar waltz like this at the ready at all times as a change-up between all the other marchlike polkas normally played on such gigs. There are no extreme range or technical challenges in this arrangement, so even fairly young ensembles could use this to include some Broadway classiness on a German band performance. Ready to go for your Oktoberfest gig!